2024 Financial Calendar

2024 Financial Calendar

Welcome to our 2024 financial calendar! This calendar is designed to help you keep track of important financial dates and deadlines, such as tax filing and government benefit distribution. You can bookmark this page for easy reference or add these dates to your personal calendar to ensure you don’t miss any important financial obligations.

If you need help with your taxes, tax packages will be available starting February 2024. Don’t wait until the last minute to get started on your tax return – make an appointment with your accountant to ensure you’re ready to go when tax season arrives.

Important 2024 Dates to Know

On January 1, 2024 the contribution room for your Tax Free Savings Account opens again. The maximum contribution for 2024 is $7,000.

If you qualify, on January 1, 2024 the contribution room for your First Home Savings Account opens. The maximum contribution for 2024 is $8,000. 

For your Registered Retirement Savings Plan contributions to be eligible for the 2023 tax year, you must make them by February 29, 2024.

GST/HST credit payments will be issued on:  

  • January 5

  • April 5

  • July 5

  • October 4

Canada Child Benefit payments will be issued on the following dates: 

  • January 19

  • February 20

  • March 20

  • April 19

  • May 17

  • June 20

  • July 19

  • August 20

  • September 20

  • October 18

  • November 20

  • December 13

The government will issue Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security payments on the following dates: 

  • January 29

  • February 27

  • March 26

  • April 26

  • May 29

  • June 26

  • July 29

  • August 28

  • September 25

  • October 29

  • November 27

  • December 20

The Bank of Canada will make interest rate announcements on:

  • January 24

  • March 6

  • April 10

  • June 5

  • July 24

  • September 4

  • October 23

  • December 11

April 30, 2024 is the last day to file your personal income taxes, and tax payments are due by this date. This is also the filing deadline for final returns if death occurred between January 1 and October 31, 2023.

May 1 to June 30, 2024 would be the filing deadline for final tax returns if death occurred between November 1 and December 31, 2023. The due date for the final return is six months after the date of death.

The tax deadline for all self-employment returns is June 17, 2024. Payments are due April 30, 2024. 

The final Tax-Free Savings Account, First Home Savings Account, Registered Education Savings Plan and Registered Disability Savings Plan contributions deadline is December 31.

December 31 is also the deadline for 2024 charitable contributions.

December 31 is also the deadline for individuals who turned 71 in 2024 to finish contributing to their RRSPs and convert them into RRIFs.

Please reach out if you have any questions. 

2023 Year-End Tax Tips and Strategies for Business Owners

2023 Year-End Tax Tips and Strategies for Business Owners

Now that we’re approaching the end of the year, it’s time to review your business finances. We’ve highlighted the most critical tax-planning tips you need to know as a business owner.

Salary/Dividend Mix

As a business owner, an essential part of tax planning is determining if you receive salary or dividends from the business.

When you’re paid a salary, the corporation can claim an income tax deduction, which reduces its taxable income. You include this pay in your personal taxable income. You’ll also create Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contribution room.

As a general guideline, if you find yourself needing to take money out of your corporation, like for personal expenses, it’s a good idea to consider withdrawing a salary to create room for contributing to your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP). By receiving a salary of up to $175,333 in 2023, you can potentially generate RRSP contribution room for the following year, amounting to a maximum of $31,560 (the 2024 limit).

If you don’t have an immediate need to withdraw funds from your corporation, you might still want to take out enough money to maximize your contributions to RRSPs and Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs). These plans can offer an effective way to earn a return on your investments without incurring taxes.

Lastly, it’s worth considering the option of leaving any surplus funds in your corporation to take advantage of substantial tax deferral benefits. This strategy may potentially result in more substantial investment income over the long term compared to personal investing.

The alternative is the corporation can distribute a dividend to you. The corporation must pay tax on its corporate income and can’t claim the dividend distributed as a deduction. However, because of the dividend tax credit, the dividend typically pays a lower tax rate (than for salary) on eligible and non-eligible dividends.

In addition to paying yourself, you can consider paying family members. These are the main options you can consider when determining how to distribute money from your business:

  • Pay a salary to family members who work for your business and are in a lower tax bracket. This enables them to declare an income so that they can contribute to the CPP and an RRSP. You must be able to prove the family members have provided services in line with the amount of compensation you give them.

  • Pay dividends to family members who are shareholders in your company. The amount of dividends someone can receive without paying income tax on them will vary depending on the province or territory they live in.

  • Distribute money from your business via income sprinkling, which is shifting income from a high-tax rate individual to a low-rate tax individual. However, this strategy can cause issues due to tax on split income (TOSI) rules. A tax professional can help you determine the best way to “income sprinkle” so none of your family members are subject to TOSI.

  • Keep money in the corporation if neither you nor your family members need cash. Taxes can be deferred if your corporation retains income and the corporation’s tax rate is lower than your tax rate.

No matter what strategy you take to distribute money from your business, keep in mind the following:

  • Your marginal tax rate as the owner-manager.

  • The corporation’s tax rate.

  • Health and payroll taxes

  • How much RRSP contribution room do you have?

  • What you’ll have to pay in CPP contributions.

  • Other deductions and credits you’ll be eligible for (e.g., charitable donations or childcare or medical expenses).

Compensation

Another important part of year-end tax planning is determining appropriate ways to handle compensation. Compensation is financial benefits that go beyond a base salary.

These are the main things to consider when determining how you want to handle compensation:

  • Can you benefit from a shareholder loan? A shareholder loan is an agreement to borrow funds from your corporation for a specific purpose and offers deductible interest.

  • Do you need to repay a shareholder loan to avoid paying personal income tax on your borrowed amount?

  • Is setting up an employee profit-sharing plan a better way to disburse business profits than simply paying a bonus?

  • Keep in mind that when an employee cashes out a stock option, only one party (the employee OR the employer) can claim a tax deduction on the cashed-out stock option.

  • Consider setting up a retirement compensation arrangement (RCA) to help fund your or your employee’s retirement.

Passive Investments

One of the most common tax advantages available to Canadian-controlled private corporations (CCPC) is the first $500,000 of active business income in a CCPC qualifies for the small business deduction (SBD), which reduces the corporate tax rate by 12% to 21%, depending on the province or territory.

With the SBD, you can reduce your corporate tax rate, but remember that the SBD will be reduced by five dollars for every dollar of passive investment income over $50,000 your CCPC earned the previous year.

The best way to avoid losing any SBD is to ensure that the passive investment income within your associated corporation group does not exceed $50,000.

These are some of the ways you can make sure you preserve your access to the SBD:

  1. Defer the sale of portfolio investments as necessary.

  2. Adjust your investment mix to be more tax efficient. For example, you could hold more equity investments than fixed-income investments. As a result, only 50% of the gains realized on shares sold is taxable, but investment income earned on bonds is fully taxable.

  3. Invest excess funds in an exempt life insurance policy. Any investment income earned on an exempt life insurance policy is not included in your passive investment income total.

  4. Set up an individual pension plan (IPP). An IPP is like a defined benefit pension plan and is not subject to the passive investment income rules.

Depreciable Assets

Consider speeding up the purchase of depreciable assets for year-end tax planning. A depreciable asset is a capital property on which you can claim Capital Cost Allowance (CCA).

Here’s how to make the most of tax planning with depreciable assets:

  • Make use of the Accelerated Investment Incentive. This incentive makes some depreciable assets eligible for an enhanced first-year allowance.

  • Consider postponing the sale of a depreciable asset if it will result in recaptured depreciation for your 2023 taxation year.

Qualified Small Business Corporation (QSBC) Share Status

Ensure your corporate shares are eligible to get you the $971,190 (for 2023) lifetime capital gains exemption (LCGE). The LCGE is $1,000,0000 for dispositions of qualified farm or fishing property.

Suppose you sell QSBC shares scheduled to close in late December 2023 to January 2024. In that case, you may want to consider deferring the sale to access a higher LCGE for 2024 and therefore defer the tax payable on any gain arising from the sale.

Consider taking advantage of the LCGE and restructuring your business to multiply access to the exemption with other family members. But, again, you should discuss this with us, your accountant and legal counsel to see how this can benefit you.

Business Transition

When considering the transfer of your business, family farm, or fishing corporation to your children or grandchildren, it is advisable to engage in a discussion with your advisor. This conversation should encompass an examination of recent and upcoming proposed changes to the Income Tax Act. These changes include the introduction of additional requirements that must be fulfilled for transfers taking place after 2023. The purpose of this discussion is to assess how these amendments may affect the tax implications associated with the sale of your assets.

Donations

Another essential part of tax planning is to make all your donations before year-end. This applies to both charitable donations and political contributions.

For charitable donations, you need to consider the best way to make your donations and the different tax advantages of each type of donation. For example, you can:

  • Donate Securities

  • Give a direct cash gift to a registered charity

  • Use a donor-advised fund account at a public foundation. A donor-advised fund is like a charitable investment account.

  • Set up a private foundation to solely represent your interests.

  • We can help walk you through the tax implications of these types of charitable donations.

  • Get year-end tax planning help from someone you can trust!

We’re here to help you with your year-end tax planning. So book a meeting with us today to learn how you can benefit from these tax tips and strategies.

Understanding Target Loss Ratio and Your Group Benefits Plan

Group benefits can be intricate both in their establishment and administration. There are numerous details and considerations to be aware of when purchasing a group benefits plan, one of which is the target loss ratio (TLR).

Key Questions Addressed:

  • What is a target loss ratio?

  • How does my TLR influence my premiums upon policy renewal?

  • What steps should I take if I have concerns regarding my TLR?

Understanding Target Loss Ratio (TLR):
Here are the primary aspects you should understand about the target loss ratio (TLR):

  • It represents the expected profit point of your employee benefit plan’s comprehensive health and dental benefits.

  • TLR is the maximum dollar amount of claims paid by the insurance company, expressed as a percentage of your premium. For instance, if an insurance company pays $40 in claims for every $80 collected in premiums, the loss ratio stands at 50%.

  • The TLR is primarily determined by two factors: the number of members participating in the employee benefit plan and the annual premium paid.

  • The loss ratios can vary based on the type of insurance. For instance, the loss ratio for property insurance is typically lower than that for health insurance.

Does my TLR Affect My Premiums Upon Renewal?
Generally, your TLR won’t have a significant influence on your premiums when renewing. However, a notable increase or decrease in the number of staff members participating in your group benefits plan might cause some impact.

Other factors influencing your renewal premiums include:

  • A substantial amount of health and dental claims made.

  • Changes in the general demographics of your employees, such as aging.

  • An increase in the cost of services covered by your group benefits plan.

  • General inflation.

Addressing Concerns About TLR:
As someone overseeing a group benefits plan, your objective is to ensure optimal value for your premium expenditure.

If you’ve been collaborating with the same insurance provider for an extended period, it’s beneficial to explore other available options. Comparing offerings can help ascertain if the rate and TLR you’re being offered align with current market standards.

It’s essential to consider how varying TLRs might influence the long-term viability of your group benefits plan. If you’re keen on gaining deeper insights, consider reaching out to industry experts or consultants for guidance.

Protecting Key Talent using Group Benefits

Building a Sustainable Future Together

As specialists in group benefits, the primary goal is to cultivate a sustainable future by collaborating closely with clients. The belief is that an informed and engaged workforce is pivotal for the success of any organization. A key component of this vision is the protection of the organization’s essential talent. This article delves into how group benefits can be instrumental in safeguarding an organization’s most treasured resource: its people.

The Importance of Essential Talent

Essential talent encompasses those employees who bring critical skills, expertise, and knowledge that propel an organization’s growth and success. These individuals form the core of any organization, ensuring its prosperity in the competitive market. Retaining such invaluable members is crucial as their absence can significantly affect business operations, productivity, and overall morale.

Challenges in Retaining Essential Talent

In the ever-evolving job market, holding onto essential talent can be a daunting task. Numerous factors, including enticing offers from rivals, opportunities for personal growth, work-life equilibrium, and employee well-being, can influence retention. For employers, recognizing and addressing these challenges is vital to safeguard top performers and sustain a competitive advantage.

The Significance of Group Benefits

Group benefits serve as a potent strategy in attracting and retaining essential talent. By presenting comprehensive and tailored benefits packages, organizations showcase their dedication to the well-being, security, and future of their employees. Here are some pivotal aspects of group benefits that aid in retaining essential talent:

  1. Health and Wellness Coverage: Offering comprehensive health and wellness benefits, such as medical, dental, and vision plans, not only fosters a healthy workforce but also signifies an organization’s commitment to overall employee well-being. Employees who feel this support are more inclined to stay loyal.

  2. Income Protection: Many group benefits packages encompass disability insurance, offering financial security for employees facing injuries or illnesses that hinder their work. Such provisions alleviate financial concerns during tough times, fostering a sense of stability and encouraging talent to remain with the organization.

  3. Retirement Planning: A meticulously crafted retirement plan appeals to essential talent. It signifies an organization’s concern for their future and dedication to ensuring their financial comfort during retirement. Contributing to such plans also strengthens the bond between employers and employees.

  4. Support for Work-Life Balance: Benefits that champion work-life balance, like flexible work schedules, paid leaves, and family leaves, reflect an organization’s understanding of the significance of a balanced life. Employees who sense this flexibility are more likely to remain devoted.

  5. Career Advancement: Benefits can also encompass professional development and training opportunities. Investing in employee growth not only sharpens their skills but also underlines an organization’s commitment to their long-term achievements.

Educational Approach and Teamwork

The role of group benefits specialists is to offer educational support and foster collaboration with clients. Through open dialogues about an organization’s aspirations and needs, it’s possible to design group benefits packages that resonate with specific demands. The collective goal is to nurture and protect essential talent, ensuring a sustainable future.

Protecting essential talent through group benefits is more than a strategic move; it embodies a dedication to employee welfare. By investing in the well-being, security, and future of employees, organizations not only boost loyalty and retention but also lay the foundation for a robust and sustainable future. The journey ahead is one of partnership, aiming for a flourishing and vibrant workforce.

Salary vs Dividend

As a business owner, you have the ability to pay yourself a salary or dividend or a combination of both. In this article and infographic, we will examine the difference between salary and dividends and review the advantages and disadvantages of each.

When deciding to pay yourself as a business owner, please review these factors:

  • How much do you need?

  • How much tax?

  • Other considerations including retirement and employment insurance.

How much do you need?

Determine your cash flow on a personal and corporate level.

  • What’s your personal after-tax cash flow need?

  • What’s your corporate cash flow need?

How much tax?

Figure out how much you will pay in tax. Business owners understand that tax is a sizeable expense.

  • What’s your personal income tax rate?

Depending on the province you reside in and your income, make sure you also include income from other sources to determine your tax rate. (Example: old age security, pension, rental, investment income etc.)

If you decide to pay out in dividends, check if you will be paying out eligible or ineligible dividends. The taxation of eligible dividends is more favorable than ineligible dividends from an individual income tax standpoint.

  • What’s your corporation’s income tax rate?

For taxation year 2020, the small business federal tax rate is 9% . Please also remember, if you pay out salary, salary is considered a tax-deductible expense, therefore this will lower the corporation’s taxable income versus paying out dividends will not lower the corporation’s taxable income.

Other considerations

If you pay yourself a salary, these options are available.

  • Do you need RRSP contribution room?

As part of this, it’s worth considering ensuring that you receive a salary high enough to take full advantage of the maximum RRSP annual contribution that you can make.

  • Are you interested in contributing to the Canada Pension Plan?

This is unique to your circumstances and a cost-benefit analysis to determine the amount of contributions makes sense.

  • Do you need employment insurance (EI)?

For shareholders owning more than 40% of voting shares, EI is optional. There are situations worth careful thought such as maternity benefit, parental benefit, sickness benefit, compassionate care benefit, family caregiver benefit for children or family caregiver benefit for adults.

The infographic below summarizes the difference between Salary vs. Dividend.

We would also advise that you get in touch with your accountant to help you determine the best mix for your unique situation.

Federal Budget 2023 Highlights

On March 28, 2023, the Federal Government released their 2032 budget. This article highlights the following financial measures:

  • New transfer options associated with Bill C-208 for intergenerational transfer.

  • New rules for employee ownership trusts.

  • Changes to how the Alternative Minimum Tax is calculated.

  • Improvements to Registered Education Savings Plans.

  • Expanding access to Registered Disability Savings Plans.

  • Grocery rebate.

  • Deduction for tradespeople tool expenses.

  • Automatic tax filing.

  • New Canadian Dental Care Plan.

Amendments To Bill C-208 Intergenerational Transfer Introduces Two New Transfer Options

Budget 2023 introduces two transfer options associated with the intergenerational transfer of a business:

  1. An immediate intergenerational business transfer (three-year test) based on arm’s length sales terms.

  2. A gradual intergenerational business transfer (five-to-ten-year test) based on estate freeze characteristics.

For the three-year test, the parent must transfer both legal and factual control of the business, including an immediate transfer of a majority of voting shares and the balance, within 36 months. The parent must also transfer a majority of the common growth shares within the same time frame. Additionally, the parent must transfer management of the business to their child within a reasonable time, with a 36-month safe harbour. The child or children must retain legal control for 36 months following the share transfer, and at least one child must remain actively involved in the business during this period.

For the gradual transfer option, the conditions are similar to the immediate transfer, but with a few differences. The parent must transfer legal control, including an immediate transfer of a majority of voting shares and the balance, within 36 months. They must also transfer a majority of the common growth shares and the balance of common growth shares within the same time frame. As well, within 10 years of the initial sale, parents must reduce the economic value of their debt and equity interests in the business to 50% of the value of their interest in a farm or fishing corporation at the initial sale time, or 30% of the value of their interest in a small business corporation at the initial sale time. The child or children must retain legal control for the greater of 60 months or until the business transfer is completed, and at least one child must remain actively involved in the business during this period.

The extended intergenerational transfer now applies to children, grandchildren, stepchildren, children-in-law, nieces and nephews and grandnieces and grandnephews.

The changes apply to transactions that occur on or after January 1, 2024. If the election is made, the capital gain reserve period is extended to ten years, and the limitation period for assessing a return is extended to three years for an immediate transfer and ten years for a gradual business transfer.

New Rules for Employee Ownership Trusts

The employees of a business can use an employee ownership trust (EOT) to purchase the business without having to pay the owner directly to acquire shares. Business owners can use an EOT as part of their succession planning.

Budget 2023 introduces new rules for using ownership trusts (EOTs) as follows:

  • Extending the five-year capital gains reserve to ten years for qualifying business transfers to an EOT.

  • A new exception to the current shareholder loan rule which extends the repayment period from one to fifteen years for amounts loaned to the EOT from a qualifying business to purchase shares in a qualifying business transfer.

  • Exempts EOTs from the 21-year deemed disposition rule that applies to some trusts. This means that shares can be held indefinitely for the benefit of employees.

Clean Energy Credits

The upcoming Budget 2023 is set to introduce a series of measures aimed at encouraging the adoption of clean energy. These measures include several business tax incentives such as:

  1. Clean Electricity Investment Tax Credit: This is a refundable tax credit of 15% for investments in equipment and activities for generating electricity and transmitting it between provinces. The credit will be available to new and refurbished projects starting from March 28, 2023, and will end in 2034.

  2. Clean Technology Manufacturing Credit: This tax credit is worth 30% of the cost of investments in new machinery and equipment for processing or manufacturing clean technologies and critical minerals. It applies to property acquired and put into use after January 1, 2024. The credit will be phased out starting in 2032 and fully eliminated in 2034.

  3. Clean Hydrogen Investment Tax Credit: It offers a refundable tax credit ranging from 15% to 40% of eligible project expenses that produce clean hydrogen, as well as a 15% tax credit for certain equipment.

  4. Clean Technology Investment Tax Credit: This tax credit will be expanded to include geothermal systems that qualify for capital cost allowance under Classes 43.1 and 43.2. The phase-out will begin in 2034, and it will not be available after that date.

  5. Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Investment Tax Credit (CCUS): The budget broadens and adjusts specific criteria for the refundable Investment Tax Credit (ITC) for CCUS. Qualified equipment now includes dual-purpose machinery that generates heat and/or power or utilizes water for CCUS and an additional process, as long as it meets all other requirements for the credit. The expense of such equipment is eligible on a proportionate basis, based on the anticipated energy or material balance supporting the CCUS process during the project’s initial 20 years.

  6. Reduced rates for zero-emission technology manufacturers: The reduced tax rates of 4.5% and 7.5% for zero-emission technology manufacturers will be extended for three years until 2034, with phase-out starting in 2032. The eligibility will expand to include the manufacturing of nuclear energy equipment and processing and recycling of nuclear fuels and heavy water for taxation years starting after 2023.

  7. Lithium from brines: Allow producers of lithium from brines to issue flow-through shares and expand the Critical Mineral Exploration Tax Credit’s eligibility to include lithium from brines.

Changes To How Alternative Minimum Tax Is Calculated

Budget 2023 proposed several changes to calculating the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), including the following:

  • The capital gains inclusion rate will increase from 80 percent to 100 percent, while capital losses and allowable business investment losses will apply at a rate of 50 percent.

  • The inclusion rate for employee stock option benefits will be altered to 100 percent, and for capital gains resulting from the donation of publicly listed securities, it will be modified to 30 percent.

  • The 30 percent inclusion rate will also apply to employee stock option benefits if any deduction is available because underlying shares are also publicly listed securities that were donated.

  • Certain deductions and expenses will now be limited to 50 percent, and only 50 percent of non-refundable credits (excluding a special foreign tax credit) will be permitted to reduce the AMT.

  • The AMT tax rate will increase from 15 percent to 20.5 percent.

  • The AMT exemption will rise from the present allowable deduction of $40,000 for individuals to an amount indexed to the fourth tax bracket, expected to be $173,000 in 2024.

  • The AMT carryforward period will remain unaltered at seven years.

Improving Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs)

Budget 2023 introduces the following changes to RESPs:

  • As of March 28, 2023, beneficiaries may withdraw Educational Assistance Payments (EAPs) up to $8,000 (from $5,000) for full-time programs and $4,000 (from $2,500) for part-time programs.

  • Individuals who withdrew EAPs before March 28, 2023, may be able to withdraw an additional EAP amount, subject to the new limits and the plan terms.

  • Divorced or separated parents can now open joint RESPs for one or more of their children.

Expanding Access to Registered Disability Savings Plans

Qualifying family members, such as a parent, a spouse, or a common-law partner, can open an RDSP and be the plan holder for an adult with mental disabilities whose ability to enter into an RDSP contract is in doubt and who does not have a legal representative.

Budget 2023 announces the government’s intention to extend the provision that allows this until December 31, 2026. To further increase access to RDSPs, the government also intends to expand the provision to include adult siblings of an RDSP beneficiary.

Grocery Rebate

The Budget 2023 will implement the Grocery Rebate, which will be a one-time payment managed through the Goods and Services Tax Credit (GSTC) system. The maximum amount that can be claimed under the Grocery Rebate is:

  • $153 for each adult

  • $81 for each child

  • $81 for a single supplement.

The implementation of the Grocery Rebate will be gradual and will follow the same income thresholds as the present GSTC regulations.

Deduction for Tradespeople’s Tool Expenses

Budget 2023 increases the employment deduction for tradespeople’s tools to $1,000 from $500. This is effective for 2023 and subsequent taxation years.

Automatic Tax Filing

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will pilot a new automatic filing service for Canadians who currently do not file their taxes to help them receive certain benefits to which they are entitled.

The CRA also plans to expand taxpayer eligibility for the File My Return service, which allows taxpayers to file their tax returns by telephone.

Canadian Dental Care Plan

In Budget 2023, the federal government is investing in dental care for Canadians with the new Canadian Dental Care Plan. The plan will provide dental coverage for uninsured Canadians with annual family incomes of less than $90,000, with no co-pays for those under $70,000.

The budget allows the CRA to share taxpayer information for the Canadian Dental Care Plan with an official of Employment and Social Development Canada or Health Canada solely to administer or enforce the plan.

Wondering How This May Impact You?

If you have any questions or concerns about how the new federal budget may impact you, call us – we’d be happy to help you!

Saskatchewan 2023 Budget Highlights

Saskatchewan 2023 Budget Highlights

On March 22, 2023, the Saskatchewan Minister of Finance announced Saskatchewan’s 2023 budget. This article covers the most important things you need to know.

No Changes To Corporate or Personal Tax Rates

There are no changes to Saskatchewan’s corporate or personal tax rates in Budget 2023.

Corporate Tax Incentives

Budget 2023 contains several measures that impact corporate tax incentives:

  • It extends the Saskatchewan Manufacturing and Processing Exporter Tax, which provides a non-refundable tax credit to eligible corporations, to December 31, 2023. This incentive offers non-refundable tax credits to qualifying corporations that recruit extra full-time employees in the manufacturing and processing sector, exceeding the number employed in 2014.

  • $4 million has been committed to expanding the Targeted Mineral Exploration Incentive, which provides a rebate on eligible drilling expenditures.

  • It increases funding for the Creative Saskatchewan Production Grant Program for film and television to $12 million.

Saskatchewan Mineral Exploration Tax Credit

The Saskatchewan Mineral Exploration Tax Credit (SMETC) is a non-refundable tax credit available to Saskatchewan taxpayers who invest in eligible flow-through shares issued by mining or exploration companies. The budget increases this tax credit to 30% (from 10%), effective the 2023 taxation year.

Provincial Sales Tax Changes

Budget 2023 introduced the following changes to exempt all of the following from the Provincial Sales Tax:

  • Labour costs and materials to repair and install exempt medical equipment into real property. This is effective as of April 1, 2023.

  • Various rigs, including commercial geothermal drilling rigs. This is retroactive to April 1, 2017.

  • Storage buildings used for storing commercially grown fruits and vegetables. Also, boats with attached harvesting equipment when primarily used in rice farming. This is retroactive to April 1, 2019.

Commitments to Healthcare, Education and Social Services

Budget 2023 contains a financial commitment to improving or expanding healthcare, education, and social services:

  • $7.1 billion is committed to healthcare services, focusing on strengthening the healthcare system, attracting more doctors and nurses, and providing support for mental health and addiction programs and services.

  • $3.1 billion for education, childcare and libraries.

  • $1.7 billion is committed to social services. Several types of benefits, including Saskatchewan Income Support, Saskatchewan Assured Income for Disability, the Seniors’ Income Benefit, and the Personal Care Home Benefit, will increase.

Infrastructure Spending

The government has budgeted almost $4 billion for capital projects this year. These are some of the highlights:

  • $98.6 million for the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert.

  • $38 million for the Weyburn General Hospital.

  • $20 million for a La Ronge long-term care home.

  • $776 million on provincial roads and highways.

  • $152.3 million for education capital, for both renovating existing schools and constructing new ones.

We can help!

We can help you determine how this year’s budget may impact your personal or business finances. Get started today and give us a call!

Why A Buy-Sell Agreement Is Vital For Your Business

Why A Buy-Sell Agreement Is Vital For Your Business

The purpose of a buy-sell agreement is to establish a set of rules or actions (that are legally binding) for what must happen to a business if one or more of the business owners is no longer involved.

Why does my business need a buy‐sell agreement?

A buy-sell agreement is vital for your business as it protects the shareholders and the business itself if one of the partners exits the business for any reason.

A buy-sell agreement offers so many benefits for your business. It:

  • Can help maintain the continuity of your business.
  • Minimize disputes between remaining co-owners and the family of the departing owner.
  • Decrease stress and uncertainty for all business owners.
  • Protect business assets and liquidity by including a solid financial and tax plan.

What are the different types of buy-sell agreements?

These are the most common types of buy-sell agreements:

  • A cross-purchase agreement. In this agreement, each remaining shareholder agrees to buy a percentage of the shares owned by the departing shareholder. The purchase can be funded by life insurance in case of the death of one of the shareholders.
  • A promissory note agreement. Each shareholder has corporate-owned life insurance in this agreement, and the corporation is the beneficiary. If a shareholder dies, the surviving shareholder(s) use a promissory note to purchase the deceased’s shares from their estate. The shareholders then use a capital dividend provided by the life insurance to pay off the promissory note.
  • A share redemption arrangement. This is similar to the promissory note agreement set up, but no promissory note is involved, and the capital dividend account pays for the deceased shareholder’s shares.

What do I need to cover in my buy‐sell agreement?

Your buy-sell agreement must address the following:

  • Valuation of the company.
  • Ownership interests.
  • Buyout clauses.
  • Terms of payment.
  • What will happen in the event of any “triggering events.”. These events can include a disagreement between business owners, a business owner getting divorced or retiring, a business owner going bankrupt or becoming disabled, or a business partner dying.

What is the best way to fund my buy-sell agreement?

This needs to be addressed when putting the buy-sell agreement together and can be challenging in the case of some “triggers,” such as a business owner getting a divorce or a disagreement between business owners.

In the case of the death of a business owner or a business owner becoming disabled, the buy-sell agreement can be funded by insurance. Insurance provides both immediate capital and significant tax benefits.

We Can Help!

Buy-sell agreements can be complex and challenging, but they are vital to protect your business and your personal interests. We can explain the best way to set one up – reach out to us today to get started!

2022 Year End Tax Tips and Strategies for Business Owners

Now that we’re approaching the end of the year, it’s time to review your business finances. We’ve highlighted the most critical tax-planning tips you need to know as a business owner.

Salary/Dividend Mix

As a business owner, an essential part of tax planning is determining if you receive salary or dividends from the business.

When you’re paid a salary, the corporation can claim an income tax deduction, which reduces its taxable income. You include this pay in your personal taxable income. You’ll also create Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contribution room. 

The alternative is the corporation can distribute a dividend to you. The corporation must pay tax on its corporate income and can’t claim the dividend distributed as a deduction. However, because of the dividend tax credit, the dividend typically pays a lower tax rate (than for salary) on eligible and non-eligible dividends. 

In addition to paying yourself, you can consider paying family members. These are the main options you can consider when determining how to distribute money from your business:

  • Pay a salary to family members who work for your business and are in a lower tax bracket. This enables them to declare an income so that they can contribute to the CPP and an RRSP. You must be able to prove the family members have provided services in line with the amount of compensation you give them.

  • Pay dividends to family members who are shareholders in your company. The amount of dividends someone can receive without paying income tax on them will vary depending on the province or territory they live in.

  • Distribute money from your business via income sprinkling, which is shifting income from a high-tax rate individual to a low-rate tax individual. However, this strategy can cause issues due to tax on split income (TOSI) rules. A tax professional can help you determine the best way to “income sprinkle” so none of your family members are subject to TOSI.

  • Keep money in the corporation if neither you nor your family members need cash. Taxes can be deferred if your corporation retains income and the corporation’s tax rate is lower than your tax rate.

No matter what strategy you take to distribute money from your business, keep in mind the following:

  • Your marginal tax rate as the owner-manager.

  • The corporation’s tax rate.

  • Health and payroll taxes

  • How much RRSP contribution room do you have?

  • What you’ll have to pay in CPP contributions.

  • Other deductions and credits you’ll be eligible for (e.g., charitable donations or childcare or medical expenses).

Compensation

Another important part of year-end tax planning is determining appropriate ways to handle compensation. Compensation is financial benefits that go beyond a base salary.

These are the main things to consider when determining how you want to handle compensation:

  • Can you benefit from a shareholder loan? A shareholder loan is an agreement to borrow funds from your corporation for a specific purpose and offers deductible interest.

  • Do you need to repay a shareholder loan to avoid paying personal income tax on your borrowed amount? 

  • Is setting up an employee profit-sharing plan a better way to disburse business profits than simply paying a bonus?

  • Keep in mind that when an employee cashes out a stock option, only one party (the employee OR the employer) can claim a tax deduction on the cashed-out stock option.

  • Consider setting up a retirement compensation arrangement (RCA) to help fund your or your employee’s retirement. 

Passive Investments

One of the most common tax advantages available to Canadian-controlled private corporations (CCPC) is the first $500,000 of active business income in a CCPC qualifies for the small business deduction (SBD), which reduces the corporate tax rate by 12 to 21 percent, depending on the province or territory. 

With the SBD, you can reduce your corporate tax rate, but remember that the SBD will be reduced by five dollars for every dollar of passive investment income over $50,000 your CCPC earned the previous year.

The best way to avoid losing any SBD is to ensure that the passive investment income within your associated corporation group does not exceed $50,000.

These are some of the ways you can make sure you preserve your access to the SBD:

  1. Defer the sale of portfolio investments as necessary.

  2. Adjust your investment mix to be more tax efficient. For example, you could hold more equity investments than fixed-income investments. As a result, only 50% of the gains realized on shares sold are taxable, but investment income earned on bonds is fully taxable.

  3. Invest excess funds in an exempt life insurance policy. Any investment income earned on an exempt life insurance policy is not included in your passive investment income total. 

  4. Set up an individual pension plan (IPP). An IPP is like a defined benefit pension plan and is not subject to the passive investment income rules.

Depreciable Assets

Consider speeding up the purchase of depreciable assets for year-end tax planning. A depreciable asset is a capital property on which you can claim Capital Cost Allowance (CCA).

Here’s how to make the most of tax planning with depreciable assets:

  • Make use of the Accelerated Investment Incentive. This incentive makes some depreciable assets eligible for an enhanced first-year allowance.

  • Purchase equipment such as zero-emissions vehicles and clean energy equipment eligible for a 100 percent tax write-off.

  • Consider postponing the sale of a depreciable asset if it will result in recaptured depreciation for your 2022 taxation year.

Qualified Small Business Corporation (QSBC) Share Status

Ensure your corporate shares are eligible to get you the $913,630 (for 2022) lifetime capital gains exemption (LCGE). The LCGE is $1,000,0000 for dispositions of qualified farm or fishing property.

Suppose you sell QSBC shares scheduled to close in late December 2022 to January 2023. In that case, you may want to consider deferring the sale to access a higher LCGE of $971,190 for 2023 and therefore defer the tax payable on any gain arising from the sale.

Consider taking advantage of the LCGE and restructuring your business to multiply access to the exemption with other family members. But, again, you should discuss this with us, your accountant and legal counsel to see how this can benefit you. 

Donations

Another essential part of tax planning is to make all your donations before year-end. This applies to both charitable donations and political contributions.

For charitable donations, you need to consider the best way to make your donations and the different tax advantages of each type of donation. For example, you can:

  • Donate Securities

  • Give a direct cash gift to a registered charity

  • Use a donor-advised fund account at a public foundation. A donor-advised fund is like a charitable investment account.

  • Set up a private foundation to solely represent your interests.

We can help walk you through the tax implications of these types of charitable donations.

Get year-end tax planning help from someone you can trust!

We’re here to help you with your year-end tax planning. So book a meeting with us today to learn how you can benefit from these tax tips and strategies.